• June 2020
    M T W T F S S
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    2930  

Scientists Succeed in Measuring Electron Spin Qubit Without Demolishing It RIKEN

March 3, 2020

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science in Japan have successfully measured electron spin in a silicon quantum dot (QD) without altering its spin. Such measurements have been difficult, as spin typically is impacted by the process of reading out single electron spins in silicon, which is to convert the spins into charges for fast detection. The researchers used the Ising model to transfer spin data of an electron in a QD to an electron in a neighboring QD; they then were able to measure the neighbor’s spin while leaving the original electron untouched. Using this method, said RIKEN’s Seigo Tarucha, yielded a non-demolition fidelity rate of 99%, a readout accuracy of 95%, and a theoretical accuracy upgrade to 99.6%.

MORE

Cal Receives Largest Donation Ever—$252M—for Datacenter

San Francisco Chronicle
Michael Cabanatuan
March 2, 2020

The University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) received an anonymous $252-million donation, which will be used to break ground on the Data Hub, a facility for students and faculty studying computing and data science. This gift is the largest donation ever given to the school, while the datacenter’s completion will require another $300 million. The Data Hub will contain the university’s Division of Computing, Data Science, and Society. UC Berkeley’s Jennifer Chayes said the facility “will be a magnet, bringing together scholars from disciplines across campus to forge new collaborations and take on some of the most critical questions facing society today, from biomedicine, to climate change and sustainability, to making data-informed public policy on issues of societal significance.”

MORE

The Case of the Elusive Majorana: So-Called ‘Angel Particle’ Still a Mystery Penn State News

Sam Sholtis
January 3, 2020

A study by researchers at Pennsylvania (Penn) State University and Germany’s University of Wurzburg casts doubt on the reported discovery of the chiral Majorana fermion in 2017. Analog versions of Majorana fermions are considered a potential pathway for building a topological quantum computer, with quantum bits shielded from environmental decoherence. The researchers analyzed dozens of devices similar to the one used to generate the so-called angel particle in the 2017 report. They found that the feature claimed to be the manifestation of the Majorana fermion was unlikely to be triggered by its existence. Said Penn State’s Cui-Zu Chang, “An important first step toward this distant dream of creating a topological quantum computer is to demonstrate definitive experimental evidence for the existence of Majorana fermions in condensed matter. Over the past seven or so years, several experiments have claimed to show such evidence, but the interpretation of these experiments is still debated.”

MORE

Python Programming Language, AWS Skills Demand Has Exploded

ZDNet
Liam Tung
November 20, 2019

Analysis of Indeed.com job search engine listings over the last five years found explosive growth in demand for skills in Python, showing the coding language is the most popular one, or on its way to becoming most popular. Job listings mentioning Python climbed from 8% in September 2014 to 18% in September 2019, with the upsurge often credited to growth in data science and interest in machine learning and artificial intelligence, helped by abundant third-party Python packages and developer tools. Indeed also revealed skyrocketing demand for developers with Amazon Web Services (AWS) skills, with about 14% of current listings calling for AWS knowledge. Indeed Hiring Lab economist Andrew Flowers said, “A big reason behind the exceptional growth of Python and AWS is that the underlying tech job mix is changing in ways that favor these programming languages.”

MORE

Graphene Enables Clock Rates in the Terahertz Range

 Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf
Christine Bohnet
September 10, 2018

Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE), and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P), all in Germany, have demonstrated that graphene can convert electronic signals with frequencies in the gigahertz range extremely efficiently into signals with several times higher frequency. The researchers used graphene containing many free electrons from the interaction of the graphene with the substrate onto which it is deposited, as well as with the ambient air. When these mobile electrons are excited by an oscillating electric field, they share their energy with the other electrons in the graphene, which react like a heated fluid. An electronic “vapor” forms within the graphene, causing rapid and strong changes in its conductivity. MPI-P researcher Mischa Bonn said, “We have demonstrated that carbon-based electronics can operate extremely efficiently at ultrafast rates. Ultrafast hybrid components made of graphene and traditional semiconductors are also conceivable.”

MORE

European Supercomputer Shines With Energy Efficiency eeNews Europe

Christoph Hammerschmidt
June 27, 2018

As Europe seeks to compete globally in developing innovative supercomputer architectures, the Julich Supercomputing Center (JSC) in Germany has launched JUWELS (Julich Wizard for European Leadership Science), marking significant progress in a new generation of flexible, modular supercomputers. JUWELS ranked 23rd on the most recent TOP500 supercomputer list, making it the fastest German system. JSC’s Thomas Lippert believes the modular design is critical to an affordable and energy-efficient technology that can aid forthcoming exascale systems. Lippert’s adaptable design concept, known as “Smart Exascale,” provides for a supercomputer with several specialized modules that can be dynamically and flexibly combined via software. The cluster module’s Intel Xeon 24-core Skylake CPUs allow for a theoretical peak performance of up to 12 petaflops, which equals the approximate computing power of 60,000 PCs. The module has extremely energy-efficient hot water cooling, allowing it to cool the majority of the waste heat with hot water directly with the outside air without additional cooling generators. Next year, JUWELS will receive a booster module for massively parallel applications that will multiply computing power. The cluster module reached a computing speed of 6.2 petaflops in initial test runs based on the Linpack benchmark.

MORE

Move Over, China: U.S. Is Again Home to World’s Speediest Supercomputer

The New York Times
Steve Lohr, June 8, 2018

Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Summit system is expected to be named the world’s fastest supercomputer in the Top500 rankings coming out later this month, effectively ending China’s five-year reign at the top of the list, says the University of Tennessee’s Jack Dongarra. Summit can execute calculations of 200 petaflops a second, and is expected to help expedite the development of artificial intelligence and other technologies. Summit is more than twice as fast as the leading supercomputer ranked in the most recent Top 500 list in November, which is based at China’s National Supercomputing Center. Powering the Oak Ridge system are 9,216 central processors from IBM and 27,648 graphics processors from Nvidia interconnected by 185 miles of fiber-optic cable. Summit is viewed as a stopgap measure, as supercomputers five times faster are in the works both in the U.S. and overseas.

More