• January 2020
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Researchers Simulate 61-Bit Quantum Computer with Data Compression

HPCwire
January 23, 2020

Researchers at the University of Chicago and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory used data compression to fit a 61-quantum bit (qubit) simulation of Grover’s quantum search algorithm on a supercomputer with 0.4% error. The researchers also modeled other quantum algorithms with significantly more qubits and quantum gates than previously possible. Although classical quantum-circuit simulation is essential for better understanding the operations and behaviors of quantum computation, the current full-state simulation limit is 48 qubits. This research offers a new tool for scaling quantum-circuit simulation by applying lossless and lossy data compression to the state vectors.

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Supercomputer Simulations Reveal Details of Galaxy Clusters

UC San Diego News Center
Jorge Salazar; Jan Zverina
January 24, 2020

A multi-institutional study led by University of California, San Diego (UCSD) researchers developed high-resolution computer simulations of galactic clusters. The RomulusC models apply black-hole physics to examine the molecular gas within and enclosing the intracluster medium, using ultraviolet light from quasars shining through the gas to explore the clusters in greater detail. The researchers used the Trident software tool to render synthetic absorption line spectra into a realistic spectrum for direct comparison to existing observations. The scientists also tapped four supercomputers, including UCSD’s Comet system, to model the clusters. Said the University of Washington’s Iryna Butsky, “Simulations are extremely important in being able to make progress in theoretical work.”

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The Case of the Elusive Majorana: So-Called ‘Angel Particle’ Still a Mystery Penn State News

Sam Sholtis
January 3, 2020

A study by researchers at Pennsylvania (Penn) State University and Germany’s University of Wurzburg casts doubt on the reported discovery of the chiral Majorana fermion in 2017. Analog versions of Majorana fermions are considered a potential pathway for building a topological quantum computer, with quantum bits shielded from environmental decoherence. The researchers analyzed dozens of devices similar to the one used to generate the so-called angel particle in the 2017 report. They found that the feature claimed to be the manifestation of the Majorana fermion was unlikely to be triggered by its existence. Said Penn State’s Cui-Zu Chang, “An important first step toward this distant dream of creating a topological quantum computer is to demonstrate definitive experimental evidence for the existence of Majorana fermions in condensed matter. Over the past seven or so years, several experiments have claimed to show such evidence, but the interpretation of these experiments is still debated.”

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