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Faster Parallel Computing

MIT News (09/13/16) Larry Hardesty

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) this week are presenting Milk, a new programming language, at the 25th International Conference on Parallel Architectures and Compilation Techniques in Haifa, Israel. With Milk, application developers can handle memory more efficiently in programs that manage scattered datapoints in large datasets. Tests on several common algorithms showed programs written in Milk topped the speed of those written in existing languages by a factor of four, and the CSAIL researchers think additional work will boost speeds even higher. MIT professor Saman Amarasinghe says existing memory management methods run into problems with big datasets because with big data, the scale of the solution does not necessarily rise in proportion to the scale of the problem. Amarasinghe also notes modern computer chips are not optimized for this “sparse data,” with cores designed to retrieve an entire block of data from main memory based on locality, instead of individually retrieving a single data item. With Milk, a coder inserts a few additional lines of code around any command that iterates via a large dataset looking for a comparatively small number of items. The researchers say Milk’s compiler then determines how to manage memory accordingly.

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Revealed: Google’s Plan for Quantum Computer Supremacy

New Scientist (08/31/16) Jacob Aron

Google expects to have the world’s largest working quantum computer ready soon, as researchers say the company is on the verge of a breakthrough. Hints were dropped in July when Google published a study in which it announced a plan to achieve “quantum supremacy” by building the first quantum computer that can perform a task beyond the capabilities of classic computers. Google publicly announced a 9-quantum-bit (qubit) system, but its goal is a 50-qubit computer that can model the behavior of a random arrangement of quantum circuits. “They’re doing a quantum version of chaos,” says Simon Devitt at Japan’s RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science. After pushing classical computing to its limit in the simulation of quantum circuit behavior on the Edison supercomputer to set the goal it hopes to achieve, Google hired University of California, Santa Barbara professor John Martinis to design superconducting qubits. Devitt thinks quantum supremacy could be achieved by the end of 2017, although meeting the challenge even within the next five years would still be a major accomplishment. Building a 50-qubit quantum device would be the first step toward a fully scalable machine, which Devitt says will indicate the technology is “ready to move out of the labs.”

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